Title: Software Developer for Scientific Computing (Junior Level 1)

Rockland Scientific is seeking a talented and enthusiastic junior software developer to join our team in the Product Development department. Core duties are to develop complex applications for data visualization and user interaction, executed on a web server.

Company Overview:
Rockland Scientific Inc. develops and manufactures scientific instruments for the measurement of turbulence for use in oceans, rivers, lakes, and laboratories. We pride ourselves to be experts in our field and the foremost manufacturer of turbulence measurement systems. Our main customers are researchers working in oceanography and limnology, focusing on climate research, deep-sea research, and coastal zone management. Rockland is located in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, where we conduct our product development and manufacturing.

Responsibilities/Duties:
·         Design of web applications for data processing.

·         Work with scientists, engineers, and technicians to extract user requirements and design suitable solutions.

·         Perform maintenance on and/or convert MATLAB libraries to facilitate executing said libraries on servers.

·         Generate PDFs from user input.

Skills and Qualifications:
·         Strong commitment to teamwork, company values and culture and shared success

·         Post-secondary Degree in Computer Science or related field

·         Knowledge in programming languages: Javascript, MATLAB, C++; Julia an asset

·         Proficiency in database design and administration

·         Familiar with web technologies – able to interface with storage providers, manage authentication, etc.

·         Able to effectively use source control; knowledge of branch, push, pull, commit

·         Documentation in TeX

·         Must be a self-motivated person, able to work under a minimum of supervision

·         Exceptional time-management skills; ability to meet project deadlines

·         Proven ability to multi-task and efficiently respond to changing priorities

·         Excellent verbal and written communication and organization skills

Schedule and Location:
·         Full-time (40 hrs/wk), 8:30 am to 5:00 pm (Mon-Fri)

·         Positing will be located in Victoria, BC

 

How to apply:
Send cover letter (1-page) and resume (2-page) to kylie@rocklandscientific.com.

Rockland Announced as Industry Partner to build 11,000m rated Hadal Water Column Profiler

On Monday the W.M. Keck Foundation announced USD $1.2M of funding to build a Hadal Water Column Profiler (HWCP) that will permit new exploration and understanding of the ocean’s deepest regions.

This uniquely capable profiling instrument will, for the first time:

• enable high quality physical, chemical, and biological sampling of the water column from the sea surface to the seafloor at 11km (36,000 ft) depth;
• withstand hundreds of cycles in and out of hadal pressures; and
• provide observations needed to illuminate important and vexing problems, such as how the deep ocean trenches are ventilated.

This three-year project will be lead by the University of Hawaií Mānoa, involving a highly qualified team of scientists, engineers and technicians from the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology.  The UH Mānoa team includes Dr. Glenn Carter, a physical oceanographer who made the first turbulent mixing measurements in the ~5km deep Samoan Passage, the primary flow pathway of Antarctic Bottom Water into the North Pacific; Dr. Jeffrey Drazen, a deep-sea ecologist and a founding member of the Hadal Ecosystems Studies (HADES) program and chief scientist for a hadal cruise to the Mariana Trench; Dr. Bruce Howe, the lead investigator on the Aloha Cabled Observatory, the deepest such observatory in the world; and Dr. Chris Measures, a chemical oceanographer who was one of the authors of the international GEOTRACES Science Plan.

HWCP industry partners include Rockland Scientific Inc., who will provide a custom turbulence sensor payload, and Ron Allum Deepsea Services who will provide the flotation, pressure tolerant batteries and design consulting. Rockland has previously supplied UH Mānoa with a 6000m Deep Ocean Vertical Microstructure Profiler profiler and Ron Allum was lead engineer and co-designer of the Deepsea Challenger, which took James Cameron to the Challenger Deep in the Marianas Trench in 2012.

The complete UH Foundation news release can be found here

HWCP Concept Drawing

Well-Attended Inaugural China Ocean Turbulence Workshop (COTW 2017) Comes to a Close

QINGDAO, CHINA, November 3, 2017 – Rockland Scientific Inc. (Rockland), in cooperation with partners JFE Advantech (JFE) and Ocean Science & Technology Company, Inc. (OST-Qingdao), have successfully concluded the inaugural China Ocean Turbulence Workshop (COTW) in Qingdao this week.  The 2017 COTW, with 45 delegates, brought together a wide range of Rockland instrument users from across China.  A comprehensive functional training course covered the design, operation, maintenance and data processing for VMP-250, VMP-500 and VMP-X, as well as the MicroRider-1000 used on the Petrel-II ocean glider, developed by Tianjin University.  There were four instructors from Rockland Scientific and JFE Advantech, while OST-Qingdao organized and facilitated the large event.

In addition to hands-on training, Rockland Scientific opened a two-week “pop-up” service workshop to perform instrument inspections, maintenance and repair at the OST-Qingdao office.  Rockland’s Chinese customers were eager to take advantage of this new service initiative.  The “pop-up” workshop also provided the opportunity for Rockland to interact with customers directly regarding service issues and further train OST-Qingdao technical staff to increase their service capabilities in-country.

The next China Ocean Turbulence Workshop is scheduled for 2018.  COTW 2018 will be expanded to include scientific presentations and panel discussions from Chinese and international microstructure turbulence researchers.  For more information, or to be notified of details as they become available, please contact info@rocklandscientific.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CRECHE Seminar: An EM flow sensor for measuring the axial speed of gliders

An underwater glider deployed by CRECHE doing fine scale measurements near Sodwana Bay [Photo: Sean Whelan – Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute]

Many thanks to the Centre for Research on Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering (CRECHE) for hosting Dr. Fabian Wolk, the President and co-founder of Rockland Scientific Inc. (Victoria, BC, Canada), a leading developer of scientific instrumentation for ocean microstructure and turbulence measurements. Fabian presented a seminar regarding instrumentation used on robotic autonomous underwater gliders that can be used for long-term ocean deployments that measure mixing and other features of our oceans. CRECHE currently has a project doing such measurements in the Agulhas current off the east coast of KZN – the first such measurements made in this region.
 
TOPIC: An electro-magnetic flow sensor for measuring the axial speed of gliders
ABSTRACT: The axial speed of the glider, U, is an important quantity that affects the flight dynamics of the glider as well as the accuracy of certain oceanographic observations. For example, accurate knowledge of U is required when converting measurement points from time-domain spacing to spatial-domain spacing. Some sensors, e.g. turbulence shear probes, require U for proper scaling of the measured signal. While U can be estimated from hydrodynamic models, a direct measurement of the axial speed is preferred in many applications.  This presentation introduces a small current speed sensor that can be added to gliders to directly measure U to improve glider-borne measurements with shear probes.

Rockland Scientific Hires Staff Scientist

VICTORIA, BC, CANADA, July 24, 2017 — Rockland Scientific Inc. announced the appointment of Dr. Justine McMillan as Staff Scientist. Dr. McMillan will act as scientific and technical liaison between Rockland’s customer base and the company’s R&D and customer service teams.  
Dr. McMillan recently completed her doctoral degree at Dalhousie University, focussing on the measurement of turbulent flows in energetic tidal channels. Her work has been instrumental in the ongoing tidal energy resource assessments. She has also become an advocate for ocean literacy and scientific communication, and is “excited to join the Rockland team.”
“I’ve used Rockland’s instrumentation in several sea-going campaigns for my research work at Dalhousie, which allowed me to develop extensive experience in the processing, analysis and interpretation of turbulence data sets. My experience enables me to support Rockland’s customers, not only helping them get their data, but also assisting them in turning the data into research-paper-ready information”, says McMillan.
About Rockland Scientific: Rockland Scientific Inc., located in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, provides sensors and instrument systems for ocean turbulence measurements. The instruments are either ship-deployed profilers, moored systems, or deployed from autonomous gliders, floats, or AUVs. RSI measurement systems are used worldwide in a multitude of disciplines, such as Climate Research, Renewable Ocean Energy, Coastal Management and Erosion Studies, and Fisheries Research. 

Rockland Scientific Awarded Camosun College Co-op Employer of the Year

Rockland Scientific has been awarded the Camosun College Co-op Technology Employer of the Year Award for 2016, as well as the overall Co-op Employer of the Year Award for 2016.

The Co-operative Education and Career Services department at Camosun College annually recognizes an outstanding employer in each of the program areas, and one employer across all program areas. The award is given based on the employer’s involvement with co-operative education ranging from assisting in workplace education preparation seminars to providing a co-op student with an enriching work experience. John Wells writes, when nominating Rockland Scientific:

“My time at RSI has been extremely positive and given me highly relevant experience that will be invaluable when seeking full time employment. This co-op has further validated my choice to pursue a career in Mechanical Engineering Technology by demonstrating that I have an aptitude for the work and that this type of work is in fact enjoyable and rewarding for me. Most importantly, I am confident that this co-op has truly initiated my transition from student to practicing technologist.”

Employer partners provide valuable and relevant learning that enhance the students’ success and that of the co-operative education program at Camosun. In particular, their strong mentorship of the students, building upon their strengths and encouraging their career growth throughout the technology world has proved invaluable. The award was presented by Nancy Sly, Director of Applied Learning, Co-operative Education and Career Services at Camosun College.

Rockland Scientific to present at the University of Porto Seminar on Ocean Turbulence

Rockland’s Dr. Rolf Lueck will be delivering the seminar Ocean Turbulence: Synergy between scientific advancement and technological innovation alongside Dr. Jorge M. Magalhães from FCUP (University of Porto). The seminar, organized by the Underwater Systems and Technology Laboratory (LSTS-FEUP), will take place on June 2nd, 2017, at the University of Porto (FEUP).

Robotic Ocean Turbulence Measurements at the Observatório Oceânico da Madeira

When scientists go on holiday: Rockland’s Dr. Rolf Lueck recently presented “Robotic Ocean Turbulence Measurements” as the guest speaker at the Observatório Oceânico da Madeira. The presentation focused on the measurement of micro-turbulence, the autonomous vehicles used with the instruments and their respective technological advances.

Boaty McBoatface’s RSI MicroRider

“Boaty’s second big adventure in the Orkney Passage (from Eleanor Frajka-Williams)

Here is the promised post about Boaty’s second mission in the Orkney Passage, which took place during 12-14 April. This post was written by Eleanor Frajka-Williams of Southampton University, with some editing by Stephen Griffies of NOAA/GFDL and Princeton University. It should appeal especially to those interested in details of Boaty’s engineering feats and some of what it does while beneath the ocean surface.”

Read the full article here.

Boaty’s Rockland Scientific MicroRider is also nicely visible in this video from the British Antarctic Survey:

Canada’s first three-glider mission maps whale habitat

Ocean Tracking Network:

For the first time in Canada, a triple glider project has successfully mapped out critical gray whale habitat off the west coast of Vancouver Island. While previous missions have deployed one or two gliders, this Whales, Habitat, and Listening (WHaLe) project—funded by the Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction, and Response (MEOPAR)—is the first to fly three coordinated gliders.

In addition to the common suite of water property sensors—temperature, salinity and oxygen—the gliders on this mission carried a broadband hydrophone to identify and count whale vocalizations, an echo sounder to remotely quantify zooplankton biomass variability, and optical instrumentation identifying phytoplankton to elucidate the major components of the whale food chain. The University of British Columbia glider also carried a specialized Rockland Scientific sensor suite for measuring ocean turbulence, to better understand why submarine canyons create such favourable habitat for the whales.

Continue Reading…